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Metal contamination results from natural geogenic and increasing anthropogenic sources leading to a growing need for ecosystems detoxification methods. Since a few years, in Lyon (France), a team considers the potential of synthetic biological systems to propose a competitive alternative to the expensive and high-volume ion-exchange resins.

 

 

These works demonstrated the efficiency of biological engineering to increase metal sequestration and biofilm formation by E. coli. Genetic engineering allows Co and Ni contaminants to be sequestered while spatially confining the bacteria to an abiotic support. Biofiltration of nickel (II) and cobalt (II) by immobilized cells appeared to be a promising option for treating these contaminants at an industrial scale.

 

To go further, the team is working on the modification of extracellular components to improve exchange surfaces and optimize metal recovering from aquatic environments. The project “CurLy’On” is engaged in the iGEM 2014 competition.

 

 

 

Project Websites:

http://2011.igem.org/Team:Lyon-INSA-ENS

http://2014.igem.org/Team:INSA-Lyon


Scientific publications associated to the bioremediation project:

Duprey, A., Chansavang, V., Frémion, F., Gonthier, C., Louis, Y., Lejeune, P., Springer, F., Desjardin, V., Rodrigue, A., Dorel, C. (2014) “ NiCo Buster ” : engineering E. coli for fast and efficient capture of cobalt and nickel. Journal of Biological Engineering 8:19 doi:10.1186/1754-1611-8-19

http://www.jbioleng.org/content/8/1/19

 

Drogue, B., Thomas, P., Balvay, L., Prigent-Combaret, C., Dorel, C. (2012) Engineering Adherent Bacteria by Creating a Single Synthetic Curli Operon. Journal of Visualized Experiments 69: e4176. doi:10.3791/4176

Metal contamination results from natural geogenic and increasing anthropogenic sources leading to a growing need for ecosystems detoxification methods